Bureaucracy Now!

May 29 – 30, 2010

Bureaucracy Now!, Parlour No. 15, is the first Parlour exhibition to take place outside of New York City. The show is guest curated by Elysa Lozano for Autonomous Organization and hosted by artist Jon Meyer in his San Francisco live-work space. It features the works of Amy Balkin, Anthony Discenza, Daniel Eatock, Josh Greene, Jonn Herschend, InCUBATE, Packard Jennings, Leo Marz, Jon Meyer, Kristin Neidlinger, Nancy Nowacek, Pil & Galia Kollectiv and Royal NoneSuch Gallery.

Titled after the exhibition Utopia Now! at the CCA Wattis in 2001, Bureaucracy Now! references this drive for a better society by:

• Bureaucracy as a medium for individual agency
• Management as self-management
• Bureaucratic engagement as opening a space for debate and negotiation
• The aesthetics of the office reconfigured or re-invented
• Examining how organization occurs, and how it can be co-opted

Press Release

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Bureaucracy Now!, Parlour No. 15, was the first Parlour exhibition to take place outside of New York City. The show was guest curated by Elysa Lozano for Autonomous Organization and hosted by artist Jon Meyer in his San Francisco live-work space.

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Installation detail. Center piece on wall, Amy Balkin, Untitled (On Warrantless Wiretapping) 2010, paper, aluminum frames, 11 inches x 20 inches (framed).

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Overview of exhibition. Suspended printer part of host Jon Meyer’s piece, One Thousand Proposals for Folding Paper Five Times.  Piece to the right of Meyer’s, Nancy Nowacek, Office for Movement Advancement & Research Headquarters, 2009, plywood, hardware, plexiglass, research materials, (including elastic bands, plyometric ball, jumpropes, books, news articles, PG Tips) 3 inches x 6 inches x 3 inches.

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Installation view of Josh Greene, Utopia Then!

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Piece by InCUBATE, Pilot Studies, 2010, booklet series.

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Installation view of Daniel Eatock, Display Book Shelf, 2009, MDF shelf, books, metal brackets, 6 feet x 1 feet x 1 feet.

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Tony Discenza, MORE IN A SERIES OF POSSIBILITIES, from an edition of 100, 2009, silkscreen on paper, 18 inches x 24 inches.

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Packard Jennings, Enthusiasm.

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On projected screen, Jonn Herschend, Self Portrait as a PowerPoint Proposal for an Amusement Park Ride, 2009, projector, collapsible screen, self running PowerPoint Presentation, corporate soundtrack, dimensions variable, TRT: 5:47 mins.

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Curator Elysa Lozano opening night singing along to Leo Marz’s piece, Karaokator: A curator can heal the world (or something like that) 2010, microphone, sound system and computer, dimensions variable.

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Royal Nonesuch Gallery with their piece, Personal, Professional, Practical, 2010, interactive exercise involving office supplies, questionnaires and gallery administration, dimensions variable.

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On computer, piece by Pil and Galia Kollectiv, Co-Operative Explanatory Capabilities in Organizational Design and Personnel Management.

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Installation detail of Nancy Nowacek, Office for Movement Advancement & Research Headquarters, 2009, plywood, hardware, plexiglass, research materials, (including elastic bands, plyometric ball, jumpropes, books, news articles, PG Tips) 3 inches x 6 inches x 3 inches.

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Opening night.

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Kids opening night  participating in host Jon Meyer’ piece, One Thousand Proposals for Folding Paper Five Times.

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Curator Elysa Lozano (Left) and featured artist Kristin Neidlinger (Right)

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Featured artist Kristin Neidlinger (Right) outfitted in her piece, Galvanic Extimacy Responder (GER), 2010, GSR, arduino nano, conductive fabric, LEDs and skin. GER (emotiv display) is an externalized intimacy- a display of the personal in the world- the interface by which we identify with the other so that we may gain greater insight of the self. Inspired by Jacques Lacan’s “extimacy” the GER visually displays the wearers emotional state for both the self and the other. A Galvanized Skin Response (GSR) is a classic lie detector test. It reads sweat (nervousness) and translates graph data. The LEDs intercept this and display the palette of red for excited, nervous or awe inspired and for calm and relaxed.